“diabetes mellitus blindness”

Notice some bleeding when you brush or floss? That may be an early sign of gum disease. If it becomes more severe, the bone that supports your teeth can break down, leading to tooth loss. Early gum disease can be reversed with proper brushing, flossing and diet. Research has shown gum disease can worsen if your blood sugar is not under control, so do your best to keep it in check.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes.

Diabetes takes a toll on your entire body, but it can also increase your risk of dental disease and other symptoms that show up in your mouth. In fact, one in five cases of total tooth loss is linked to diabetes.

Generally, ankle swelling (edema) and puffiness due to the accumulation of fluid can be controlled by either reducing the drug dose or addition of a diuretic such as spironolactone (Aldactone); note that furosemide (Lasix) does not work as well. On occasion, patients may be symptomatic enough from fluid retention to warrant drug withdrawal. Some recent studies have suggested an association between untoward cardiac events and pioglitazone and rosiglitazone (for example, heart attacks), but this association is controversial. The controversy notwithstanding, it has been well established that pioglitazone and rosiglitazone should be avoided in patients with symptomatic heart failure or heart failure.

One way to cheat: Coffee and tea, optionally with a bit of cream — but never with sugar or other sweeteners — can be used as a snack if you are having an especially hard time lasting til your next meal.

Commit to managing your diabetes. Learn all you can about type 2 diabetes. Make healthy eating and physical activity part of your daily routine. Establish a relationship with a diabetes educator, and ask your diabetes treatment team for help when you need it.

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce insulin, so replacement insulin must be delivered by injection, pump, or inhalation. People who have type 1 diabetes need to carefully plan and follow meals, timing of meals, and activity to keep their blood glucose (sugar) in check. It’s important to measure blood sugar levels as low blood sugar can be dangerous, too.

Insulin is not available in oral tablet form, although a new inhaled insulin product called Afrezza was approved in 2014. Afrezza is an ultra rapid-acting inhaled insulin that is administered with meals to improve blood sugar control in adult Insulin is usually is delivered by injections that are required one to four times per day. Some people use an insulin pump, which is worn at all times and delivers a steady flow of insulin throughout the day.

A: People diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes should discuss their individual dietary needs with their doctor or nutritionist. The key is balancing diet, exercise, and insulin intake to achieve blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible.

Again, this could be attributed solely to your inadequate hydration levels. (Even mild dehydration is associated with a whole range of not-so-fun symptoms.) But big swings in blood sugar among diabetics could also explain this fatigue, according to a 2011 study from the University of Illinois, Chicago. The study also found sleep-related issues like restless-leg syndrome tended to be higher among diabetics, and could explain why folks with diabetes often report feeling wiped out.

When people discover you have diabetes, they may proudly offer you sugar-free versions of favorite treats or beverages. Sugar-free claims may mean that foods are calorie-free, or they could contain carbs and calories, like cookies and candy. Read the ingredients and the Nutrition Facts label to know for sure.

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