“diabetes mellitus genetic predisposition”

The most common diabetes symptoms include frequent urination, intense thirst and hunger, weight gain, unusual weight loss, fatigue, cuts and bruises that do not heal, male sexual dysfunction, numbness and tingling in hands and feet.

That snappy disposition that’s replaced your normally sunny one could be a sneaky sign of diabetes. Blood sugar dips, nausea, fatigue, and poor circulation can make anyone feel less than terrific, often making those with unmanaged diabetes irritable.

While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, eyes, limbs and organs. In fact, hyperglycemia or high levels of blood sugar is a telltale sign of diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) as well as prediabetes. When left untreated, diabetes can cause complications like an increased chance of coronary heart disease, trouble getting pregnant or a risky pregnancy, vision loss, digestive issues, and more.

Not everyone with type 2 diabetes needs to use insulin. If you do, it’s because your pancreas isn’t making enough insulin on its own. It’s crucial that you take insulin as directed. There are other prescription medications that may help as well.

Foot damage. Nerve damage in the feet or poor blood flow to the feet increases the risk of various foot complications. Left untreated, cuts and blisters can develop serious infections, which often heal poorly. These infections may ultimately require toe, foot or leg amputation.

With the different types of retinopathy, small blood vessels (capillaries) in the back of the eye balloon and form pouches, which blocks normal blood flow. This can develop in stages and worsen until vision loss is possible when the capillary walls lose their ability to control the passage of substances between the blood and the retina. Fluid and blood can leak into parts of the eyes, block vision, cause scar tissue to form, and distort or pull the retina out of its normal alignment, which impairs vision.

High blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Your blood sugar level can rise for many reasons, including eating too much, being sick or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. Check your blood sugar level often, and watch for signs and symptoms of high blood sugar — frequent urination, increased thirst, dry mouth, blurred vision, fatigue and nausea. If you have hyperglycemia, you’ll need to adjust your meal plan, medications or both.

Jump up ^ Kiho Hui J, Yamane A, Ukai S (1993). “Polysaccharides in fungi. XXXII. Hypoglycemic activity and chemical properties of a polysaccharide from the cultural mycelium of Cordyceps sinensis”. Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin. 16 (12): 1291–93. doi:10.1248/bpb.16.1291. PMID 8130781.

Even small amounts of physical activity can help. Experts suggest that you aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity 5 days of the week.3 Moderate activity feels somewhat hard, and vigorous activity is intense and feels hard. If you want to lose weight or maintain weight loss, you may need to do 60 minutes or more of physical activity 5 days of the week.3

Jump up ^ Sarwar N, Gao P, Seshasai SR, Gobin R, Kaptoge S, Di Angelantonio E, Ingelsson E, Lawlor DA, Selvin E, Stampfer M, Stehouwer CD, Lewington S, Pennells L, Thompson A, Sattar N, White IR, Ray KK, Danesh J (2010). “Diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose concentration, and risk of vascular disease: A collaborative meta-analysis of 102 prospective studies”. The Lancet. 375 (9733): 2215–22. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60484-9. PMC 2904878 . PMID 20609967.

“If you have been able to manage on lifestyle intervention [or changes] alone, continue to do that. If you need to go on medication, do what’s necessary [for] your health,” Albright says. “You need to take advantage of the treatment that’s going to keep your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol in check.”

Jump up ^ Konno, S; Tortorelis, DG; Fullerton, SA; Samadi, AA; Hettiarachchi, J; Tazaki, H (2001). “A possible hypoglycaemic effect of maitake mushroom on Type 2 diabetic patients”. Diabetic medicine. 18 (12): 1010. doi:10.1046/j.1464-5491.2001.00532-5.x. PMID 11903406.

It is commonly thought that people with diabetes should avoid all forms of sugar. Most people with diabetes can eat foods containing sugar as long as the total amount of carbohydrates (carbs) for that meal or snack is consistent.

Broccoli is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family, which includes other veggies such as Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, and bok choy. What makes this class of veggies unique is the high levels of sulfur-containing compounds known as glucosinolates. Perhaps better known for their potential anticancer effects, these compounds may also have a role in reducing heart disease risk and heart-related deaths. In a study reported in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2011, researchers found that cruciferous vegetable consumption was associated with a reduced risk of death from heart disease. Their recommendation: “Increase consumption of vegetables, particularly cruciferous vegetables and fruit, to promote cardiovascular healthy and overall longevity.”

Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone. Your pancreas produces it and releases it when you eat. Insulin helps transport sugar from your bloodstream to cells throughout your body, where it’s used for energy.

This class of medication can be given with other oral agents when blood sugar levels are not at goal, as well in patients who cannot tolerate metformin or sulfonylureas; however, they are not usually used as first line treatments.

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