“diabetes mellitus risk factors”

To make sure you don’t put yourself at a higher risk for heart problems, work with your doctor to make sure you maintain near normal blood pressure, blood cholesterol and triglyceride (lipid) levels. Ideally, your blood pressure shouldn’t go over 130/80. You should also try to maintain a healthy weight and reduce inflammation in general. The best way to do this is to eat an unprocessed, healthy diet as well as exercise and sleep well.

Oral diabetes drugs are usually reserved for use only after lifestyle measures have been unsuccessful in lowering glucose levels to the target of an HbA1c below 7.0%, achieved through an average glucose reading of around 8.3-8.9 mmol/L (around 150-160 mg/dL).1-3

In countries using a general practitioner system, such as the United Kingdom, care may take place mainly outside hospitals, with hospital-based specialist care used only in case of complications, difficult blood sugar control, or research projects. In other circumstances, general practitioners and specialists share care in a team approach. Home telehealth support can be an effective management technique.[91]

Doctors also recommend you often you bathe when your skin is dry, use natural and mild products to clean your skin (instead of many harsh, chemical products sold in most stores), moisturize daily with something mild like coconut oil for skin, and avoid burning your skin in the sun.

Sugar is one of your body’s main sources of energy. If you have diabetes, your body’s inability to convert sugar into energy can lead to fatigue. This can range from a general worn-down feeling to extreme exhaustion.

Jump up ^ Santaguida PL, Balion C, Hunt D, Morrison K, Gerstein H, Raina P, Booker L, Yazdi H. “Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment of Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose”. Summary of Evidence Report/Technology Assessment, No. 128. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Archived from the original on 16 September 2008. Retrieved 20 July 2008.

The American Diabetes Association recommends that premeal blood sugar levels fall in the range of 80 to 120 mg/dL and bedtime blood levels fall in the range of 100 to 140 mg/dL. Your doctor may adjust this depending on your circumstances.

The benefits of T1D medications far outweigh their associated side effects. The most common side effects of insulin are injection site reactions, which includes redness, soreness or irritation around the area. People can also experience lowered potassium levels and a risk of hypoglycemia. While these side effects can sound daunting, keep in mind that many people using these medications don’t experience serious side effects at all.

“People need to understand the continuum of diabetes,” she says. “If they’re on an upward trajectory of insulin resistance and a downward trajectory of insulin production weight loss, healthful eating and physical activity will slow down the insulin-loss trajectory and improve insulin sensitivity.” But, she says, “If they gain weight back, the diabetes comes back.”

Severe abdominal pain: Depending on the location, this can be a sign of heart attack, abdominal aortic aneurysm (dangerous widening of the large artery in the abdomen), diabetic ketoacidosis, or interrupted blood flow to the bowels.

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. Your guide to diabetes: Type 1 and type 2. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Accessed June 26, 2013. http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/type1and2/index.htm

The word mellitus (/məˈlaɪtəs/ or /ˈmɛlɪtəs/) comes from the classical Latin word mellītus, meaning “mellite”[105] (i.e. sweetened with honey;[105] honey-sweet[106]). The Latin word comes from mell-, which comes from mel, meaning “honey”;[105][106] sweetness;[106] pleasant thing,[106] and the suffix -ītus,[105] whose meaning is the same as that of the English suffix “-ite”.[107] It was Thomas Willis who in 1675 added “mellitus” to the word “diabetes” as a designation for the disease, when he noticed the urine of a diabetic had a sweet taste (glycosuria). This sweet taste had been noticed in urine by the ancient Greeks, Chinese, Egyptians, Indians, and Persians.

Some of the risk factors for insulin resistance include fatty liver, heart disease, strokes, peripheral vascular disease, high cholesterol, and smoking. Treatment for insulin resistance are lifestyle changes and if necessary, medication.

Glucagon is a hormone that causes the release of glucose from the liver (for example, it promotes gluconeogenesis). Glucagon can be lifesaving and every patient with diabetes who has a history of hypoglycemia (particularly those on insulin) should have a glucagon kit. Families and friends of those with diabetes need to be taught how to administer glucagon, since obviously the patients will not be able to do it themselves in an emergency situation. Another lifesaving device that should be mentioned is very simple; a medic-alert bracelet should be worn by all patients with diabetes.

The good news is that prognosis can be improved with good blood-sugar control. Maintaining tight blood sugar control has been proven to prevent, slow the progression of, and even improve established complications of type 1 diabetes.

Diabetic persons are advised to make morning appointments to the dental care provider as during this time of the day the blood sugar levels tend to be better kept under control. Not least, individuals who suffer from diabetes must make sure both their physician and dental care provider are informed and aware of their condition, medical history and periodontal status.

Jump up ^ Tupola, S; Rajantie, J; Mäenpää, J (1998). “Severe hypoglycaemia in children and adolescents during multiple-dose insulin therapy”. Diabetic medicine. 15 (8): 695–69. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1096-9136(199808)15:8<695::AID-DIA651>3.0.CO;2-C. PMID 9702475.

Finger stick blood glucose values tend to be most inaccurate at very high or very low levels, so abnormally low or high results should be confirmed by repeat testing. Finger stick is the way most people with diabetes monitor their blood sugar levels at home.

If these results aren’t consistent, your doctor will move on to other testing options. But your doctor may skip these tests if you have certain conditions, such as pregnancy, that will render the results inaccurate.

The body does not produce insulin. Some people may refer to this type as insulin-dependent diabetes, juvenile diabetes, or early-onset diabetes. People usually develop type 1 diabetes before their 40th year, often in early adulthood or teenage years.

Type 2 diabetes oral medications are prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes in conjuction with lifestyle changes like diet and exercise. There are nine classes of drugs approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Examples of type 2 oral diabetes medications include acarbose (Precose), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), and metformin (Glucophage). Side effects, drug interactions, warnings and precautions, dosage, and breastfeeding and pregnancy safety information should be reviewed prior to taking any medication.

It is possible to have diabetes with only very mild symptoms or without developing any symptoms at all. Such cases can leave some people with diabetes unaware of the condition and undiagnosed. This happens in around half of people with type 2 diabetes.1,2

There is no single dietary pattern that is best for all people with diabetes. For overweight people with type 2 diabetes, any diet that the person will adhere to and achieve weight loss on is effective.[75][76]

Reduce soft drinks, soda and juice. For each 12 oz. serving of a sugar-sweetened beverage you drink a day, your risk for diabetes increases by about 15 percent. Try sparkling water with a twist of lemon or lime instead. Cut down on creamers and sweeteners you add to tea and coffee.

Fact: Studies have shown that eating too much protein, especially animal protein, may actually cause insulin resistance, a key factor in diabetes. A healthy diet includes protein, carbohydrates, and fats. Our bodies need all three to function properly. The key is a balanced diet.

^ Jump up to: a b c Vos T, Flaxman AD, Naghavi M, Lozano R, Michaud C, Ezzati M, Shibuya K, Salomon JA, Abdalla S, Aboyans V, et al. (15 December 2012). “Years lived with disability (YLDs) for 1160 sequelae of 289 diseases and injuries 1990–2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010”. Lancet. 380 (9859): 2163–96. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61729-2. PMID 23245607.

Living With Diabetes Recently Diagnosed Where Do I Begin With Type 2 Start Here Getting Started With Diabetes Taking Care of Your Diabetes Choosing What, How Much, and When to Eat Getting Active Aerobic Activity Weight Loss Medicines Checking Blood Glucose How Do You Feel? Getting Support

Jump up ^ Manohar V, Talpur NA, Echard BW, Lieberman S, Preuss HG (2002). “Effects of a water-soluble extract of maitake mushroom on circulating glucose/insulin concentrations in KK mice”. Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism. 4 (1): 43–48. doi:10.1046/j.1463-1326.2002.00180.x. PMID 11874441.

If you smoke or use other types of tobacco, ask your doctor to help you quit. Smoking increases your risk of various diabetes complications. Smokers who have diabetes are more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than are nonsmokers who have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Talk to your doctor about ways to stop smoking or to stop using other types of tobacco.

That’s doubly true if you’re middle-aged or older. The fall in estrogen levels associated with menopause can make it difficult for a woman’s body to maintain healthy blood sugar levels, which can increase her risk for diabetes, says Leanne Redman, PhD, an associate professor of endocrinology and women’s health at Louisiana State University’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center (PBRC).

I am not diabetic. With that said, I will also admit that I have a good chance-if I were to stray from my low sugar, low starch diet-to become diabetic. After all, it was diabetes that affected my father and aided in the formation (though the doctor said that it had been a common side effect of the drugs used to combat his cancer) or the embolism that ended his life. Of course, he was unwilling to adjust in order to keep his blood sugars at safe levels. It is also diabetes that has taken my grandmother’s eyesight, though Parkinson’s has taken her ability to walk.

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