“diabetes mellitus y tipos”

Jump up ^ Cukierman, T (8 Nov 2005). “Cognitive decline and dementia in diabetes – systematic overview of prospective observational studies”. Springer-Verlag. doi:10.1007/s00125-005-0023-4/fulltext.html (inactive 2018-01-25). Retrieved 28 Apr 2013.

Jump up ^ Cox DJ, Ritterband L, Magee J, Clarke W, Gonder-Frederick L (2008). “Blood Glucose Awareness Training Delivered Over The Internet”. Diabetes Care. 31 (8): 1527–28. doi:10.2337/dc07-1956. PMC 2494647 . PMID 18477813.

Pramlintide, an amylin analog, is an agent that delays gastric emptying, blunts pancreatic secretion of glucagon, and enhances satiety. It is FDA-approved for use in adults with type 1 diabetes. It has been shown to induce weight loss and lower insulin doses. Concurrent reduction of prandial insulin dosing is required to reduce the risk of severe hypoglycemia.

Blood tests ordered by a doctor can confirm whether or not someone has diabetes. If their blood sugar is unusually high and they have several classic symptoms, their doctor may order only one test. Often, tests are carried out on two different days to confirm the diagnosis.

They also have to balance the food they eat with the amount of insulin they take and their activity level. That’s because eating some foods will cause blood sugar levels to go up more than others, whereas insulin and exercise will make blood sugar go down. How much the blood sugar level goes up after eating depends on the type of nutrients the food contains.

Type 2 diabetes: Type 2 diabetes has strong genetic links, so type 2 diabetes tends to run in families. Several genes have been linked to type 2 diabetes, and many are under study related to type 2 diabetes. Risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes include the following:

JDRF the leading diabetes foundation funding T1D research. JDRF’s goal is to progressively remove the impact of T1D from people’s lives until we achieve a world without T1D. JDRF collaborates with a wide spectrum of partners and is the only organization with the scientific resources, regulatory influence, and a working plan to better treat, prevent, and eventually cure T1D. JDRF is currently sponsoring $530 million in scientific research in 17 countries. In 2012 alone, JDRF provided more than $110 million to T1D research. Learn more at JDRF.org.

The good news about type 2 diabetes is that if you do the diabetes treatment steps listed above, your blood sugar levels can return to a healthier range. For some people with type 2 diabetes, that can mean not even needing to take diabetes medicines anymore.

Gestational diabetes is high blood glucose that develops at the late stages of pregnancy in a person who does not have diabetes. Although gestational diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born, a woman may be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Gestational diabetes can be caused by hormones or lack of insulin.

Metformin does not stimulate the pancreas to make or release more insulin. It does not cause hypoglycemia or weight gain therefore obese patients with type 2 diabetes are usually started on biguanides.

There are some interesting developments in blood glucose monitoring including continuous glucose sensors. The new continuous glucose sensor systems involve an implantable cannula placed just under the skin in the abdomen or in the arm. This cannula allows for frequent sampling of blood glucose levels. Attached to this is a transmitter that sends the data to a pager-like device. This device has a visual screen that allows the wearer to see, not only the current glucose reading, but also the graphic trends. In some devices, the rate of change of blood sugar is also shown. There are alarms for low and high sugar levels. Certain models will alarm if the rate of change indicates the wearer is at risk for dropping or rising blood glucose too rapidly. One version is specifically designed to interface with their insulin pumps. In most cases the patient still must manually approve any insulin dose (the pump cannot blindly respond to the glucose information it receives, it can only give a calculated suggestion as to whether the wearer should give insulin, and if so, how much). However, in 2013 the US FDA approved the first artificial pancreas type device, meaning an implanted sensor and pump combination that stops insulin delivery when glucose levels reach a certain low point. All of these devices need to be correlated to fingersticks measurements for a few hours before they can function independently. The devices can then provide readings for 3 to 5 days.

However, the benefits of this can be canceled out by the problems associated with a higher fat diet taken in to compensate for the lower amount of carbohydrates. This problem can be improved by substituting monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats for saturated fats.

Physical activity. Everyone needs regular aerobic exercise, and people who have diabetes are no exception. Exercise lowers your blood sugar level by moving sugar into your cells, where it’s used for energy. Exercise also increases your sensitivity to insulin, which means your body needs less insulin to transport sugar to your cells. Get your doctor’s OK to exercise. Then choose activities you enjoy, such as walking, swimming or biking. What’s most important is making physical activity part of your daily routine. Aim for at least 30 minutes or more of aerobic exercise most days of the week. If you haven’t been active for a while, start slowly and build up gradually.

The ADA states that the total costs of prediabetes and diabetes in the U.S. are roughly $322 billion according to the latest statistics. Treating diabetes has soared; the average price of insulin nearly tripled between 2002 and 2013.

If you’re experiencing symptoms of diabetes, you should make an appointment with your doctor. During this time, you should ask your doctor if there’s anything you need to do before your appointment, such as prepare for any labs tests. This may be necessary if your doctor wants to perform a fasting blood sugar test.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) “Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes” includes ADA’s current clinical practice recommendations and is intended to provide the components of diabetes care, general treatment goals and guidelines, and tools to evaluate quality of care. Members of the ADA Professional Practice Committee, a multidisciplinary expert committee, are responsible for updating the Standards of Care annually, or more frequently as warranted. For a detailed description of ADA standards, statements, and reports, as well as the evidence-grading system for ADA’s clinical practice recommendations, please refer to the Standards of Care Introduction. Readers who wish to comment on the Standards of Care are invited to do so at professional.diabetes.org/SOC.

And the cure for type 2 diabetes has nothing to do with giving insulin or taking drugs to control your blood sugar. In fact, giving insulin to someone with type 2 diabetes is one of the worst things that can be done.

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