“diabetes unicorn”

Complications of any type of diabetes include damage to blood vessels, leading to heart disease or kidney disease. Damage to blood vessels in the eye can result in vision problems including blindness. Nerve damage can occur, leading to diabetic neuropathy.

Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes.

Control and outcomes of both types 1 and 2 diabetes may be improved by patients using home glucose meters to regularly measure their glucose levels.[citation needed] Glucose monitoring is both expensive (largely due to the cost of the consumable test strips) and requires significant commitment on the part of the patient. The effort and expense may be worthwhile for patients when they use the values to sensibly adjust food, exercise, and oral medications or insulin. These adjustments are generally made by the patients themselves following training by a clinician.

The good news is that this symptom is reversible once blood sugar levels are returned to normal or near normal. But let your blood sugar go unchecked for long periods and the glucose will cause permanent damage, possibly even blindness. And that’s not reversible.

Same goes for canned fruit: This variety often contains sugary syrup at a high concentration, which should be avoided at all costs. Trendy juices are similarly less than ideal, as they’re stripped of the beneficial fiber that you’d find in whole fruit with the skin on.

Have you ever noticed a cold sore or a cut in your mouth that doesn’t quite seem to go away? This can be another way that diabetes may affect your mouth. Poor control of blood sugar can keep injuries from healing quickly and properly. If you have something in your mouth that you feel isn’t healing as it should, see your dentist.

Jump up ^ Barnard ND, Katcher HI, Jenkins DJ, Cohen J, Turner-McGrievy G; Katcher; Jenkins; Cohen; Turner-Mcgrievy (May 2009). “Vegetarian and vegan diets in type 2 diabetes management”. Nutrition Reviews. 67 (5): 255–63. doi:10.1111/j.1753-4887.2009.00198.x. PMID 19386029.

This modality can be contrasted with the emphasis of conventional medicine, which is to cure or mitigate disease, as reported by the American Holistic Health Association. For example, a conventional practitioner will follow an established algorithm for diabetes management that includes a medically established protocol centered on monitoring blood sugar and prescribing medications to balance it. An alternative medicine provider takes a personalized, whole-person approach that may include a prescription for changes in diet and exercise habits, stress reduction, and other lifestyle considerations. (The table below offers a comparison of alternative medicine with conventional medicine.)

There is also a growing body of evidence that the antioxidants found in cranberries may reduce the risk of heart disease by reducing LDL (bad) cholesterol, maintaining or improving HDL (good) cholesterol, and lowering blood pressure.

The progression of nephropathy in patients can be significantly slowed by controlling high blood pressure, and by aggressively treating high blood sugar levels. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) used in treating high blood pressure may also benefit kidney disease in patients with diabetes.

There are now three large randomized controlled trials reporting statistically significant reductions in cardiovascular events for two SGLT2 inhibitors (empagliflozin and canagliflozin) and one GLP-1 receptor agonist (liraglutide) where the majority, if not all patients, in the trial had ASCVD. The empagliflozin and liraglutide trials demonstrated significant reductions in cardiovascular death. Exenatide once-weekly did not have statistically significant reductions in major adverse cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality but did have a significant reduction in all-cause mortality. In contrast, other GLP-1 receptor agonists have not shown similar reductions in cardiovascular events (Table 9.4). Whether the benefits of GLP-1 receptor agonists are a class effect remains to be definitively established. See antihyperglycemic therapies and cardiovascular outcomes in Section 9 “Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Management” and Table 9.4 for a detailed description of these cardiovascular outcomes trials. Additional large randomized trials of other agents in these classes are ongoing.

The treatment goals are related to effective control of blood glucose, blood pressure and lipids, to minimize the risk of long-term consequences associated with diabetes. They are suggested in clinical practice guidelines released by various national and international diabetes agencies.

Thanks for the recipes! And yes, it’s me the LADA/1.5 (a.k.a. “Type Weird”) diabetic, weighing in on beans: can’t eat ’em because even in small quantities they make my blood sugar spike. Dang. Oh. And starches? Bread? Sweet potatoes? Fageddaboudit! Thank goodness there are green veggies, eggs, full-fat cheese, plus tofu and nuts. P.S.: Love the blog.

Not being able to produce insulin or use it effectively leads to raised glucose levels in the blood (known as hyperglycaemia). Over the long-term high glucose levels are associated with damage to the body and failure of various organs and tissues.

Jump up ^ Yang, Y; Hu, X; Zhang, Q; Zou, R (November 2016). “Diabetes mellitus and risk of falls in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis”. Age and ageing. 45 (6): 761–67. doi:10.1093/ageing/afw140. PMID 27515679.

Cardiovascular disease. Diabetes dramatically increases the risk of various cardiovascular problems, including coronary artery disease with chest pain (angina), heart attack, stroke and narrowing of arteries (atherosclerosis). If you have diabetes, you are more likely to have heart disease or stroke.

Conventional: A dietary pattern that includes carbohydrates from fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and low-fat milk is encouraged for good health. Carbohydrate intake should be monitored using carbohydrate counting or experienced-based The Recommended Dietary Allowance for digestible carbohydrates is 130 g/day, which will provide a sufficient amount of glucose needed to fuel the central nervous system without reliance on glucose production from protein or fat. Using foods with a low glycemic index that are rich in fiber and other important nutrients is encouraged.

Gestational diabetes (the type triggered by pregnancy and hormonal changes) affects about 4 percent of all pregnant women, especially Hispanic, African-American, Native American and Asian women, along with those who are over 25 years old, above their normal body weight before pregnancy and who have a family history of diabetes. (10b)

The early symptoms of untreated diabetes are related to elevated blood sugar levels, and loss of glucose in the urine. High amounts of glucose in the urine can cause increased urine output (frequent urination) and lead to dehydration.

The soluble fiber in oatmeal might also help blunt the rise in blood glucose by delaying stomach emptying and providing a physical barrier to digestive enzymes and absorptive surfaces, according to the professional publication Today’s Dietitian.

Severe abdominal pain: Depending on the location, this can be a sign of heart attack, abdominal aortic aneurysm (dangerous widening of the large artery in the abdomen), diabetic ketoacidosis, or interrupted blood flow to the bowels.

Jump up ^ Arguedas, JA; Perez, MI; Wright, JM (Jul 8, 2009). Arguedas, Jose Agustin, ed. “Treatment blood pressure targets for hypertension”. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (3): CD004349. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD004349.pub2. PMID 19588353.

Regardless of the form, soy products have a deserved reputation for providing high-quality protein that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol. In fact, soy is a great way to help meet the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendation to “replace protein foods that are high in solids fats (such as many meats) with choices that are lower in solid fats and calories.”

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends eating fish twice a week. Unlike many meats, seafood is low in unhealthy saturated fat and cholesterol, plus it’s a good source of omega-3 fatty acids — particularly fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines, halibut, and albacore tuna. According to the American Heart Association, omega-3 fatty acids lower the risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats), which can lead to sudden death. Omega-3s also decrease triglyceride levels, slow the growth rate of atherosclerotic plaque, lower blood pressure, and curb inflammation. Further, ongoing studies are evaluating their effectiveness for decreasing the risk for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Lifestyle changes are the cornerstone of diabetes management for all patients. In addition to medication, achieving goals for weight management and diet, physical activity, smoking cessation, and moderate alcohol use is imperative for diabetes control.

^ Jump up to: a b Gonzalez, J.S., Tanenbaum, M.L, Commissariat P.V. (2016). “Psychosocial factors in medication adherence and diabetes self-management: implications for research and practice”. American Psychologist. 71: 539–51. doi:10.1037/a0040388.

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), also known by the name Stein-Leventhal syndrome, is a hormonal problem that causes women to have a variety of symptoms including irregular or no menstrual periods, acne, obesity, and excess hair growth. Treatment of PCOS depends partially on the woman’s stage of life and the symptoms of PCOS.

Your doctor may also suggest a zinc transporter 8 autoantibody (ZnT8Ab) test. This blood test — along with other information and test results — can help determine if a person has type 1 diabetes instead of another type. The goal of having the ZnT8Ab test is a prompt and accurate diagnosis and that can lead to timely treatment.

Plus, cutting back on added sugar can help you control blood sugar, lose weight and lower your risk of chronic disease overall. My favorite thing about nixing added sugar? It allows you to save room for a real indulgence instead (aim for about 200 calories a pop).

“So, if this man’s meal plan developed with a dietitian states that he can eat 60 grams of carbohydrate at a meal, he can decide how he ‘spends’  those 60 grams. One time he may have 2/3 cup of rice and one cup of peas. Another time he may decide, for his carb choices, to eat a small baked potato, a cup of milk and have the brownie for dessert.”

Diabetes is a leading cause of death in all industrialized nations. Overall, the risk of premature death of people with diabetes is twice that of people who do not have diabetes. Prognosis depends on the type of diabetes, degree of blood sugar control, and development of complications.

Secret #4) Get sunshine or vitamin D. More than 70% of white Americans are vitamin D deficient. That number rises to 97% among African Americans (https://www.naturalnews.com/026657_Vitamin_D_…). Latinos and Asians are at around 80% deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency promotes diabetes (and cancer, heart disease, kidney disease, immune suppression, and so on).

A preferred drug can provide more than one benefit (for example, lower blood sugar and control cholesterol). Cost of drug therapy is relatively small compared to costs of managing chronic complications associated with poorly controlled diabetes.

If your body doesn’t make enough or any insulin, or if your cells resist the insulin your body makes, the glucose can’t get into them and you have no energy. This can make you more hungry and tired than usual.

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