“diabetes and weight loss”

Jump up ^ Segal-Isaacson CJ; Carello E; Wylie-Rosett J (October 2001). “Dietary fats and diabetes mellitus: is there a good fat?”. Curr Diab Rep. NLM.NIH.gov. 1 (2): 161–69. doi:10.1007/s11892-001-0029-3. PMID 12643112.

There is also increasing evidence that nuts can improve blood sugar control in type 2 diabetes. In a Canadian study published in Diabetes Care in 2011, researchers found people with type 2 diabetes who ate 2 ounces of mixed nuts daily saw a decrease in blood sugar levels and LDL (bad) cholesterol. The study was funded in part by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research Foundation and the Almond Board of California, among other supporters.

Healthy carbohydrates. During digestion, sugars (simple carbohydrates) and starches (complex carbohydrates) break down into blood glucose. Focus on the healthiest carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes (beans, peas and lentils) and low-fat dairy products.

Sensation in the legs should be checked regularly using a tuning fork or a monofilament device. Diabetic neuropathy is a leading cause of lower extremity ulcers in individuals with diabetes, which frequently lead to amputation of the feet or legs.

HOWEVER, if today you are not your ideal weight (a BMI of about 22), you are already in this vicious cycle and you need to break out of it. In order to break out and quickly get down to your ideal weight, you need one more rule, the rule of using special tricks:

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that everyone, including people with diabetes, eat 2-1/2 cups of vegetables per day. If your blood sugar rises after you eat vegetables, check your portion sizes:

Secret #5) Avoid all processed foods. Avoid eating refined anything. That includes white breads, processed meat (which strongly promotes diabetes) and dairy products. Switch from cow’s milk to almond milk (Blue Diamond brand is good, but I suggest you avoid the Silk brand). Reduce or eliminate cheese from your diet. If you eat meat, eat only fresh unprocessed meat, never eat processed packaged meat because it contains sodium nitrite, a chemical that destroys pancreas function. This means no pepperoni pizza, no ham and potato soup, no deli meat sandwiches and so on.

Veggie omelet: Cook 1 egg white in a pan with 2 tsp canola, peanut or olive oil. Add ½ c spinach leaves, ½ c mushrooms, onions, garlic, and herbs as desired; and top with 2 Tbsp reduced fat cheese. Serve with 1 slice 100% whole grain toast spread with 1 tsp canola-oil margarine and 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage.

100 to 125 mg/dL Prediabetes (also called Impaired Fasting glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This condition puts you at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Mechanism of insulin release in normal pancreatic beta cells. Insulin production is more or less constant within the beta cells. Its release is triggered by food, chiefly food containing absorbable glucose.

Type 2 diabetes is usually controlled with diet, weight loss, exercise, and/or oral medications. However, more than half of all people with type 2 diabetes require insulin to control their blood sugar levels at some point during the course of their illness.

You can choose from many types of stretching exercises. Yoga is a type of stretching that focuses on your breathing and helps you relax. Even if you have problems moving or balancing, certain types of yoga can help. For instance, chair yoga has stretches you can do when sitting in a chair or holding onto a chair while standing. Your health care team can suggest whether yoga is right for you.

126 mg/dL or more Diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes) Type 2 diabetes develops when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or develops “insulin resistance” and can’t make efficient use of the insulin it makes. It greatly increases your risk of heart disease and stroke.

Make physical activity part of your daily routine. Regular exercise can help prevent prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and it can help those who already have diabetes to maintain better blood sugar control. Thirty minutes of moderate exercise — such as brisk walking — most days of the week is recommended. A combination of exercises — aerobic exercises, such as walking or dancing on most days, combined with resistance training, such as weightlifting or yoga twice a week — often helps control blood sugar more effectively than does either type of exercise alone.

Learned a few things…Cannot say whether successful or not…but, I feel much better. Some of the ideas are easy to implement. Others more questionable…but, may turn out to be helpful. I feel better after implementing just a couple of the suggestions.

Thanks David for the great information. And thanks to all you who post. It is wonderful to get so much personal experiences in one place. I have found that peas have a lot of protein. They also are high in carbs. I eat about of cup of them with broccoli and some tahini & garlic for dinner so the carbs are ok. After going to one of your “here’s” I have decided to add Braggs amino in the mix as well. I am exercising again and have cut way down on the carbs. Weight is coming off which I did not think would happen, as I have been trying to lose with no results. Most important to me is my numbers are coming down. I am not at the place that many of the above folks are, but now have new hope of getting off medication, or at least cutting down. Again Thank you for helping me find a new way to health.

Comments

  1. Agnes

    In older patients, clinical practice guidelines by the American Geriatrics Society states “for frail older adults, persons with life expectancy of less than 5 years, and others in whom the risks of intensive glycemic control appear to outweigh the benefits, a less stringent target such as HbA1c of 8% is appropriate”.[4]
    I am not diabetic. With that said, I will also admit that I have a good chance-if I were to stray from my low sugar, low starch diet-to become diabetic. After all, it was diabetes that affected my father and aided in the formation (though the doctor said that it had been a common side effect of the drugs used to combat his cancer) or the embolism that ended his life. Of course, he was unwilling to adjust in order to keep his blood sugars at safe levels. It is also diabetes that has taken my grandmother’s eyesight, though Parkinson’s has taken her ability to walk.

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