“diabetes mellitus requiring hypoglycemic medications”

^ Jump up to: a b c d Grams, J.; Garvey, W. Timothy (June 2015). “Weight Loss and the Prevention and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Using Lifestyle Therapy, Pharmacotherapy, and Bariatric Surgery: Mechanisms of Action”. Current Obesity Reports. 4 (2): 287–302. doi:10.1007/s13679-015-0155-x. ISSN 2162-4968. PMID 26627223.

These last few years have been exciting times in diabetes care. Many agents for treating type 2 diabetes are under development. Options for insulin therapy and methods for insulin delivery continue to expand and refine. While research continues across multiple areas, one thing remains constant. Achieving the best blood sugar control possible remains the ultimate goal in all people with diabetes. Without doubt, good blood sugar control minimizes the serious long-term complications of diabetes, including blindness, nerve damage, and kidney damage. Finally, a healthy lifestyle always helps and must remain the cornerstone of diabetes management.

For a lot of us it is about balance. I eat very little of what would be considered a ‘fast’ carb — like corn (really a grain). Over the years I have learned to include only a small amount of a ‘fast’ carb in any meal. I am a firm believer in trying to never let your blood sugar go higher than 140 to avoid body damage.

With this said, I must say that this book peaked my interest. Not from a personal stand point, but from a less personal and more inquisitive view. While I would not really call this a cure, I would applaud this author for their break through. How you choose to eat, what you choose to eat, and whether you exercise are indeed a concern. And a preventative lifestyle, even implemented after a diagnosis can sometimes make the problem become less hazardous. Even almost non existent.

Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes may discover that if they are overweight at diagnosis and then lose weight and begin regular physical activity, their blood glucose returns to normal. Does this mean diabetes has disappeared? No. The development of type 2 diabetes is a gradual process, too, in which the body becomes unable to produce enough insulin for its needs and/or the body’s cells become resistant to insulin’s effects. Gradually the patient goes from having “impaired glucose tolerance” — a decreased but still adequate ability to convert food into energy — to having “diabetes.”

Diet is an important tool to keep your heart healthy and blood sugar levels within a safe and healthy range. It doesn’t have to be complicated or unpleasant. The diet recommended for people with type 2 diabetes is the same diet just about everyone should follow. It boils down to a few key actions:

Take stress seriously. The hormones your body may produce in response to prolonged stress may prevent insulin from working properly, which will raise your blood sugar and stress you even more. Set limits for yourself and prioritize your tasks. Learn relaxation techniques. And get plenty of sleep.

Have you been going to the bathroom to urinate more often recently? Do you notice that you spend most of the day going to the toilet? When there is too much glucose (sugar) in your blood you will urinate more often.

The test involves sticking the patient’s finger for a blood sample, which is then placed on a strip that has been inserted into a machine that reads the blood level. These machines are only accurate to within about 10%-20% of true laboratory values.

A random blood sugar test may reveal high blood sugar levels. A hemoglobin A1C test can provide more information about average blood sugar levels over a few months. Your child may also need a fasting blood sugar test.

One thought on ““diabetes mellitus requiring hypoglycemic medications””

  1. Second, hypoglycemia can affect a person’s thinking process, coordination, and state of consciousness.[58][59] This disruption in brain functioning is called neuroglycopenia. Studies have demonstrated that the effects of neuroglycopenia impair driving ability.[58][60] A study involving people with type 1 diabetes found that individuals reporting two or more hypoglycemia-related driving mishaps differ physiologically and behaviorally from their counterparts who report no such mishaps.[61] For example, during hypoglycemia, drivers who had two or more mishaps reported fewer warning symptoms, their driving was more impaired, and their body released less epinephrine (a hormone that helps raise BG). Additionally, individuals with a history of hypoglycemia-related driving mishaps appear to use sugar at a faster rate[62] and are relatively slower at processing information.[63] These findings indicate that although anyone with type 1 diabetes may be at some risk of experiencing disruptive hypoglycemia while driving, there is a subgroup of type 1 drivers who are more vulnerable to such events.
    With this said, I must say that this book peaked my interest. Not from a personal stand point, but from a less personal and more inquisitive view. While I would not really call this a cure, I would applaud this author for their break through. How you choose to eat, what you choose to eat, and whether you exercise are indeed a concern. And a preventative lifestyle, even implemented after a diagnosis can sometimes make the problem become less hazardous. Even almost non existent.

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