“diabetes mellitus risk factors type 2”

Exercise naturally supports your metabolism by burning fat and building lean muscle. To prevent and reverse diabetes, make exercise a part of your daily routine. This doesn’t necessary mean that you have to spend time at the gym. Simple forms of physical activity, like getting outside and walking for 20 to 30 minute every day, can be extremely beneficial, especially after meals. Practicing yoga or stretching at home or in a studio is another great option.

Sugary breath isn’t as sweet as it seems.  Diabetics often notice that they’ve developed sweet or nail-polish-like breath before they’re diagnosed. However, if you’re dealing with this strange symptom, time is of the essence. Sweet breath is often a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis, a condition in which your body can’t effectively convert glucose into energy, keeping your blood sugar at dangerous—potentially fatal—levels if untreated.

The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. What is known is that your immune system — which normally fights harmful bacteria or viruses — attacks and destroys your insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This leaves you with little or no insulin. Instead of being transported into your cells, sugar builds up in your bloodstream.

But some pleasant news: When consumed in moderation and made with whole ingredients and without added sugar, fruit smoothies can be a good food for diabetes. Consider stocking your fridge with unsweetened frozen fruit so you can whip up one in a hurry for breakfast. Adding ingredients with protein, such as yogurt or a small amount of nut butter, will also help your body break down the carbohydrates more slowly, leading to less of a spike in blood sugar.

Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2)

Fresh cranberries, which contain the highest levels of beneficial nutrients, are at their peak from October through December. As cranberries grow wild in the northern regions of the United States, they are readily available in all regions during the fall months and almost always are sold packaged in plastic bags. Choose bags of cranberries with firm, plump, red berries with no signs of leakage. Uncooked cranberries can be kept in the refrigerator about a week. One cup of whole, unsweetened berries has only 51 calories and 13 grams of carb, and they are a good source of vitamin C. Fortunately, you can freeze cranberries to use throughout the year.

If you drink alcohol, do so responsibly. Alcohol can cause either high or low blood sugar, depending on how much you drink and if you eat at the same time. If you choose to drink, do so only in moderation — one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger — and always with food.

“A 1/2-cup serving of cooked kale has only 18 calories and 4 grams of carbohydrate. It contains almost all the important nutrients, from vitamin A to zinc,” says Connie Crawley, RD, LD, Nutrition and Health Specialist at the University of Georgia Extension Service. “When you go to the farmer’s market, there are so many varieties to choose from, you are bound to find one that you like. It can be steamed, sauteed, microwaved, or stir-fried.”

Diabetes, short for diabetes mellitus, refers to a variety of metabolic disorders that cause high blood sugar levels over a protracted period of time. They occur either due to inefficient insulin production by the pancreas or to an inability by cells to react properly to the insulin that is released. Unfortunately, there is no current cure for diabetes, and treatment only seeks to prevent the various symptoms as well as the medical complications associated with the disease. The earlier it is detected, the sooner one may be able to begin treatment for diabetic woes. For the purpose of early detection, the following signs are what one must watch out for.

Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with the disease.[2] Type 1 DM must be managed with insulin injections.[2] Type 2 DM may be treated with medications with or without insulin.[6] Insulin and some oral medications can cause low blood sugar.[10] Weight loss surgery in those with obesity is sometimes an effective measure in those with type 2 DM.[11] Gestational diabetes usually resolves after the birth of the baby.[12]

“For people with diabetes who don’t respond to oral medications or non-insulin injectables, insulin can be started as a long-acting preparation once a day,” Sivitz says. Short-acting insulin may be added before meals if long-acting insulin alone isn’t effective enough.

In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a “honeymoon period” shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the “honeymoon period” diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months to a year. The patient’s insulin needs are minimal and some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin.

Diabetes predisposes people to elevated blood pressure, high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Both independently and together with hyperglycemia, these conditions increase the risk of heart disease, kidney disease, and other blood vessel complications.

If you have a family history or other risk factors for diabetes or if you have been diagnosed with prediabetes, there are a number of healthy living tips you can follow to prevent or delay the of diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, these same tips can slow the progression of the disease.

Krzysztof Slusarczyk/ShutterstockThe list of benefits for nuts goes on and on. They contain vitamin E, unsaturated fats, fiber, plant sterols, omega-3 fatty acids, and L-arginine, which makes arteries less prone to blood clots. Nuts can also improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes.

Ginkgo, garlic, holy basil leaves, fenugreek seeds, ginseng, and hawthorn are other herbals that have been promoted by some as remedies for diabetic symptoms. More research is needed to see what, if any, role these herbals may play. Check with your doctor before trying any herbal product.

While there are no specific recommendations, most health authorities recommend eating 1-2 tablespoons of flaxseed daily, either in whole or ground (milled) form. Enjoy the nutty-flavor seed on cereal, on salads, or mixed into quick breads and smoothies.

In the 1950s, the American Diabetes Association, in conjunction with the U.S. Public Health Service, introduced the “exchange scheme”. This allowed people to swap foods of similar nutrition value (e.g., carbohydrate) for another. For example, if wishing to have more than normal carbohydrates for dessert, one could cut back on potatoes in one’s first course. The exchange scheme was revised in 1976, 1986, and 1995.[8]

American Diabetes Association (ADA). Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes – 2018. Diabetes Care 2018 Jan; 41(Supplement 1): S1-S2. Accessed Jan. 21, 2018 at https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/diacare/suppl/2017/12/08/41.Supplement_1.DC1/DC_41_S1_Combined.pdf

Afrezza (insulin human) Inhalation Powder was approved by the FDA in June 2014. Afrezza is an ultra rapid acting inhaled insulin indicated to improve blood sugar control in adult patients with diabetes. It is an insulin given through an inhaler at meals that helps to control blood sugar spikes due to mealtime insulin. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It can be used in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, it is given with injectable insulin.

One thought on ““diabetes mellitus risk factors type 2””

  1. Men, women, and children can develop diabetes, but the disease can present problems unique to women. A 2007 study found that between 1971 and 2000, death rates for men with diabetes declined, but death rates for women did not.
    While poor vision is hardly uncommon—more than 60 percent of the American population wears glasses or contacts, after all—sudden changes in your vision, especially blurriness, need to be addressed by your doctor. Blurry vision is often a symptom of diabetes, as high blood sugar levels can cause swelling in the lenses of your eye, distorting your sight in the process. Fortunately, for many people, the effect is temporary and goes away when their blood sugar is being managed.
    Jump up ^ Willi C, Bodenmann P, Ghali WA, Faris PD, Cornuz J (Dec 12, 2007). “Active smoking and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis”. JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association. 298 (22): 2654–64. doi:10.1001/jama.298.22.2654. PMID 18073361.
    Diabetes is a common disease, yet every individual needs unique care. We encourage people with diabetes and their families to learn as much as possible about the latest medical therapies and approaches, as well as healthy lifestyle choices. Good communication with a team of experts can help you feel in control and respond to changing needs.

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