“diabetes mellitus values”

Gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) usually shows up in the middle of the pregnancy and typically doesn’t have any symptoms. If you’re pregnant, you should be tested for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy so you can make changes if needed to protect your health and your baby’s health.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), from 1980 through 2010, the number of American adults aged 18 and older with diagnosed diabetes more than tripled—soaring from 5.5 million to 20.7 million. Moreover, diabetes epidemic shows no signs of slowing down, affecting 25.8 million people in 2011. Another 79 million adults have prediabetes, putting them at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes down the road, according to the CDC.

Excessive thirst typically goes hand-in-hand with increased urination. As your body pulls water out of the tissues to dilute your blood and to rid your body of sugar through the urine, the urge to drink increases. Many people describe this thirst as an unquenchable one. To stay hydrated, you drink excessive amounts of liquids. And if those liquids contain simple sugars (soda, sweet iced tea, lemonade, or juice, for example) your sugars will skyrocket even higher.

Heart attack happens when a blood clot completely obstructs a coronary artery supplying blood to the heart muscle. A heart attack can cause chest pain, heart failure, and electrical instability of the heart.

Dawn phenomenon: How to control high morning blood sugars The dawn phenomenon is a natural rise in blood sugar that happens before a person wakes up. How does it affect people with diabetes? Find out here. Read now

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) resembles type 2 DM in several respects, involving a combination of relatively inadequate insulin secretion and responsiveness. It occurs in about 2–10% of all pregnancies and may improve or disappear after delivery.[46] However, after pregnancy approximately 5–10% of women with gestational diabetes are found to have diabetes mellitus, most commonly type 2.[46] Gestational diabetes is fully treatable, but requires careful medical supervision throughout the pregnancy. Management may include dietary changes, blood glucose monitoring, and in some cases, insulin may be required.

Prevailing beliefs up to the mid-1990s were that people with diabetes should avoid foods that contain so-called “simple” sugars and replace them with “complex” carbohydrates, such as those found in potatoes and cereals. A review of the research at that time revealed that there was relatively little scientific evidence to support the theory that simple sugars are more rapidly digested and absorbed than starches, and therefore more apt to produce high blood glucose levels.

You may eat normally and constantly feel hungry, yet continue to lose weight. This can be seen with type 1 diabetes. If your body isn’t getting enough energy from the foods that you eat, it will break down other energy sources available within the body. This includes your fat and protein stores. When this happens, it can cause you to lose weight.

Diabetes predisposes people to elevated blood pressure, high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Both independently and together with hyperglycemia, these conditions increase the risk of heart disease, kidney disease, and other blood vessel complications.

The condition of diabetes causes the sugar content of the blood to rise above normal levels. This requires the patient’s kidneys to work harder than usual, so that the excess sugar can be removed successfully. This overtime work results in the formation of excess urine, causing the person to have frequent urges to urinate. Such a condition isn’t just distracting, it can also lead to kidney damage and eventually kidney failure in case no treatment is undertaken. Frequent urination can hence be a very significant warning of diabetes and should be reported to a physician if prolonged.

Long-term use of metformin may be associated with biochemical vitamin B12 deficiency, and periodic measurement of vitamin B12 levels should be considered in metformin-treated patients, especially in those with anemia or peripheral neuropathy. B

In older patients, clinical practice guidelines by the American Geriatrics Society states “for frail older adults, persons with life expectancy of less than 5 years, and others in whom the risks of intensive glycemic control appear to outweigh the benefits, a less stringent target such as HbA1c of 8% is appropriate”.[4]

Jump up ^ Zitzmann M (October 2009). “Testosterone deficiency, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome”. Nature Reviews Endocrinology. 5 (12): 673–81. doi:10.1038/nrendo.2009.212. PMID 19859074.

The guava leaf seems to decrease the sugars fasting as well. In a study of people with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, those who drank guava leaf tea with each meal for 12 weeks had lower fasting blood sugar levels than before they started drinking tea.

Type 2 DM is primarily due to lifestyle factors and genetics.[41] A number of lifestyle factors are known to be important to the development of type 2 DM, including obesity (defined by a body mass index of greater than 30), lack of physical activity, poor diet, stress, and urbanization.[13] Excess body fat is associated with 30% of cases in those of Chinese and Japanese descent, 60–80% of cases in those of European and African descent, and 100% of Pima Indians and Pacific Islanders.[8] Even those who are not obese often have a high waist–hip ratio.[8]

Damage to the nerves in the autonomic nervous system can lead to paralysis of the stomach (gastroparesis), chronic diarrhea, and an inability to control heart rate and blood pressure during postural changes.

Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the “good” cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood.

Sometimes medications — such as metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, others) — also are an option if you’re at high risk of diabetes, including when your prediabetes is worsening or if you have cardiovascular disease, fatty liver disease or polycystic ovary syndrome.

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  1. Cushing’s syndrome, sometimes referred to as hypercortisolism, is a hormonal disorder caused by prolonged exposure to high levels of the hormone cortisol. Symptoms may include obesity, thinning arms and legs, a rounded face, and increased fat around the neck. Some causes of Cushing’s syndrome is from taking glucocorticoid hormones such as prednisone for inflammatory diseases. Treatment for Cushing’s syndrome depends on the cause.

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