“diabetes mellitus vs diabetes insipidus”

Finger stick blood glucose values tend to be most inaccurate at very high or very low levels, so abnormally low or high results should be confirmed by repeat testing. Finger stick is the way most people with diabetes monitor their blood sugar levels at home.

With all the emphasis on diet, research on influence of various types of foods on the diabetes patients is still going on unabated. Researchers in this area are the most confused lot. They are certain about effects of some items of food. Vague opinions also float. For example, the researchers are sure that cooked foods raise blood glucose higher than the raw foods. Whether foods with sugar raise blood glucose higher than the foods with starch, is still uncertain!

Another diabetes-related sexual dysfunction symptom in men is reduced amounts of ejaculation, or retrograde ejaculation. Retrograde ejaculation is a condition in which the semen goes into the bladder, rather than out of the body through the urethra. Diabetes and damage to the blood vessels causes nerve damage to the muscles that control the bladder and urethra, which results in this problem.

Exenatide is the first in the incretin mimetic class of drugs for type 2 diabetes. Exenatide shares many therapeutic properties with GLP-1, and it mimics natural physiology for self-regulating blood sugar. Namely, exenatide slows stomach emptying and slows the release of glucose from the liver, thereby regulating delivery of nutrients to the intestine for absorption. Exenatide also works centrally in the brain to regulate hunger.

Second, hypoglycemia can affect a person’s thinking process, coordination, and state of consciousness.[58][59] This disruption in brain functioning is called neuroglycopenia. Studies have demonstrated that the effects of neuroglycopenia impair driving ability.[58][60] A study involving people with type 1 diabetes found that individuals reporting two or more hypoglycemia-related driving mishaps differ physiologically and behaviorally from their counterparts who report no such mishaps.[61] For example, during hypoglycemia, drivers who had two or more mishaps reported fewer warning symptoms, their driving was more impaired, and their body released less epinephrine (a hormone that helps raise BG). Additionally, individuals with a history of hypoglycemia-related driving mishaps appear to use sugar at a faster rate[62] and are relatively slower at processing information.[63] These findings indicate that although anyone with type 1 diabetes may be at some risk of experiencing disruptive hypoglycemia while driving, there is a subgroup of type 1 drivers who are more vulnerable to such events.

126 mg/dL or more Diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes) Type 2 diabetes develops when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or develops “insulin resistance” and can’t make efficient use of the insulin it makes. It greatly increases your risk of heart disease and stroke.

Jump up ^ Cui, M., Wu, X., Mao, J., Wang, X., & Nie, M. (2016). “T2DM Self-Management via Smartphone Applications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis”. PLOS ONE. 11 (11): e0166718. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0166718.

Call your doctor immediately if one or more of these symptoms occurs in you or your loved one. It is extremely important to receive medical attention—misdiagnosis or leaving your condition untreated can have tragic consequences, including death.

Numbness that starts as a tingling in the hands, fingers, legs, and feet is often an early warning sign of diabetes. This occurs due to an increase in blood sugar levels, causing blood vessel restriction to the extremities, and eventually damage to nerve fibers. For many, this numbness is often the first sign of any health issues.

Regularly checking blood sugar or glucose levels is an essential part of diabetes care. Blood sugar levels are measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). A normal blood sugar range is between 70 and 120 mg/dL.

Education regarding matching prandial insulin dosing to carbohydrate intake, premeal glucose levels, and anticipated activity should be considered, and selected individuals who have mastered carbohydrate counting should be educated on fat and protein gram estimation (3–5). Although most studies of multiple daily injections versus continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) have been small and of short duration, a systematic review and meta-analysis concluded that there are minimal differences between two forms of intensive insulin therapy in A1C (combined mean between-group difference favoring insulin pump therapy –0.30% [95% CI –0.58 to –0.02]) and severe hypoglycemia rates in children and adults (6). A 3-month randomized trial in patients with type 1 diabetes with nocturnal hypoglycemia reported that sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy with the threshold suspend feature reduced nocturnal hypoglycemia without increasing glycated hemoglobin levels (7). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also approved the first hybrid closed-loop system pump. The safety and efficacy of hybrid closed-loop systems has been supported in the literature in adolescents and adults with type 1 diabetes (8,9).

Be aware of any pre-appointment restrictions. When you make the appointment, ask if you need to do anything in advance. This will likely include restricting your diet, such as for a fasting blood sugar test.

Diabetes meal plans and a healthy diet. American Diabetes Association. http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/diabetes-meal-plans-and-a-healthy-diet.html. Accessed Aug. 18, 2016.

American Diabetes Association (ADA). Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes – 2018. Diabetes Care 2018 Jan; 41(Supplement 1): S1-S2. Accessed Jan. 27, 2018 at https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/diacare/suppl/2017/12/08/41.Supplement_1.DC1/DC_41_S1_Combined.pdf

Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often appear suddenly and are often the reason for checking blood sugar levels. Because symptoms of other types of diabetes and prediabetes come on more gradually or may not be evident, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended screening guidelines. The ADA recommends that the following people be screened for diabetes:

The earliest surviving work with a detailed reference to diabetes is that of Aretaeus of Cappadocia (2nd or early 3rd century CE). He described the symptoms and the course of the disease, which he attributed to the moisture and coldness, reflecting the beliefs of the “Pneumatic School”. He hypothesized a correlation of diabetes with other diseases, and he discussed differential diagnosis from the snakebite which also provokes excessive thirst. His work remained unknown in the West until 1552, when the first Latin edition was published in Venice.[101]

Have you heard or read about treating diabetes with “a new molecular therapy that uses targeted peptides and proteins to restore cellular function”.I therefore recommend you to do a Google search for the term “Peptide treatment”, or the company named”Regenerative Cellular Therapy”.

Between 2001 and 2009, the prevalence of type 1 diabetes among the under 20s in the USA rose 23%, according to SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth data issued by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). (Link to article)

Comments

  1. Agnes Perry

    Eggs provide a great dose of satiating protein (6 grams per whole egg), and are a healthy choice compared to many meats. For people with diabetes, nutrition experts do recommend limiting yolks to about three times a week, but you can have whites more often. One large egg white has about 16 calories and 4 grams of protein, notes nutritionist Joy Bauer, RD on her website, making them a “perfect food for blood sugar control, not to mention weight-loss or maintenance.”
    This leafy green veggie is high in beta-carotene, an antioxidant the body uses to make vitamin A. Beta-carotene also protects cells from free-radical damage, which contributes to chronic illnesses and aging.
    Rosiglitazone (Avandia) has been associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, and experts have debated the severity of these concerns. On September 23, 2010, the U.S. FDA announced significant restrictions on rosiglitazone (Avandia) for those with type 2 diabetes. These new restrictions responded to data suggesting elevated risk of cardiovascular events (for example, heart attack and stroke) in patients treated with rosiglitazone. GlaxoSmithKline (the manufacturer of rosiglitazone) was required to establish a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program, with mandatory participation by patients, their health-care providers and pharmacists in order to receive, prescribe, or sell rosiglitazone.
    Monitoring your blood sugar. Depending on your treatment plan, you may check and record your blood sugar as often as several times a week to as many as four to eight times a day. Careful monitoring is the only way to make sure that your blood sugar level remains within your target range. People who receive insulin therapy also may choose to monitor their blood sugar levels with a continuous glucose monitor. Although this technology doesn’t yet replace the glucose meter, it can provide important information about trends in blood sugar levels.

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