“diabetes nutrition education”

The risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases with age, and the disease becomes more common in people over age 45. As stated above, anyone 45 years of age or older who is overweight or obese and that has at least one other risk factor for diabetes should get tested for diabetes.

Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as “non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus” (NIDDM) or “adult-onset diabetes”.[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2]

Weight loss surgery in those with obesity and type two diabetes is often an effective measure.[85] Many are able to maintain normal blood sugar levels with little or no medications following surgery[86] and long-term mortality is decreased.[87] There is, however, a short-term mortality risk of less than 1% from the surgery.[88] The body mass index cutoffs for when surgery is appropriate are not yet clear.[87] It is recommended that this option be considered in those who are unable to get both their weight and blood sugar under control.[89]

Optimize your vitamin D levels. Recent studies have revealed that getting enough vitamin D can have a powerful effect on normalizing your blood pressure and that low vitamin D levels may increase your risk of heart disease.

Subsequent gestational diabetes. Once you’ve had gestational diabetes in one pregnancy, you’re more likely to have it again with the next pregnancy. You’re also more likely to develop diabetes — typically type 2 diabetes — as you get older.

The American Diabetes Association and many experts recommend that 50% to 60% of daily calories come from carbohydrates, 12% to 20% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat. People with diabetes may benefit from eating small meals throughout the day, instead of eating one or two heavy meals. No foods are absolutely forbidden for people with diabetes. Attention to portion control and advance meal planning can help people with diabetes enjoy the same meals as everyone else.

“People with diabetes often describe being very thirsty,” Silver says. When your blood sugar levels are high, the amount of sodium in your blood tends to drop. Sodium helps your body hold onto water, so a drop in blood sodium can increase thirst, research shows. Drinking water will resolve the issue temporarily. But if you feel like you’re much thirstier than you used to be (even though you’re drinking the same amount of water) that’s warning sign.

We’ll explain the various diabetes warning signs and also warning signs of specific diabetes problems. Discover why it’s important to listen to your body and alert your doctor if you notice any new signs or problems.

• Tofu, or bean curd (4 ounces), made from curdled soy milk, can be eaten in salads or stir-fries, or used as an ingredient in cooking. Silken tofu (1/2 cup) is a softer form of tofu that can be used to make sauces and desserts requiring a thick, creamy texture.

Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight.

Gestational diabetes (the type triggered by pregnancy and hormonal changes) affects about 4 percent of all pregnant women, especially Hispanic, African-American, Native American and Asian women, along with those who are over 25 years old, above their normal body weight before pregnancy and who have a family history of diabetes. (10b)

Hemoglobin A1c or HbA1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells. The HbA1c test is used to monitor blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes over time. Normal HbA1c levels are 6% or less. HbA1c levels can be affected by insulin use, fasting, glucose intake (oral or IV), or a combination of these and other factors. High hemoglobin A1c levels in the blood increases the risk of microvascular complications, for example:

Diabetes can go into remission. When diabetes is in remission, you have no signs or symptoms of it. But your risk of relapse is higher than normal.1 That’s why you make the same daily healthy choices that you do for active type 2 diabetes.

The term “diabetes” or “to pass through” was first used in 230 BCE by the Greek Apollonius of Memphis.[99] The disease was considered rare during the time of the Roman empire, with Galen commenting he had only seen two cases during his career.[99] This is possibly due to the diet and lifestyle of the ancients, or because the clinical symptoms were observed during the advanced stage of the disease. Galen named the disease “diarrhea of the urine” (diarrhea urinosa).[101]

140 to 199 mg/dL Prediabetes (also called Impaired Fasting Glucose) Blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This condition puts you at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says.

Jump up ^ Cox DJ, Penberthy JK, Zrebiec J, Weinger K, Aikens JE, Frier BM, Stetson B, DeGroot M, Trief P, et al. (2003). “Diabetes and Driving Mishaps: Frequency and correlations from a multinational survey”. Diabetes Care. 26 (8): 2329–34. doi:10.2337/diacare.26.8.2329. PMID 12882857.

These drugs rapidly lower blood sugar, but can cause abnormally low blood sugar (called hypoglycemia). In addition, sulfonylureas contain sulfa and should be avoided by patients who are allergic to sulfa.

Type 2 diabetes is typically diagnosed during adulthood, usually after age 45 years. It was once called adult-onset diabetes mellitus, or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. These names are no longer used because type 2 diabetes does occur in young people, and some people with type 2 diabetes require insulin therapy.

Type 2 diabetes (T2D): Although the pancreas still secretes insulin, the body of someone with type 2 diabetes is partially or completely incapable of responding to insulin. This is often referred to as insulin resistance. The pancreas tries to overcome this resistance by secreting more and more insulin. People with insulin resistance develop type 2 diabetes when they fail to secrete enough insulin to cope with their body’s demands.

Diet is an important tool to keep your heart healthy and blood sugar levels within a safe and healthy range. It doesn’t have to be complicated or unpleasant. The diet recommended for people with type 2 diabetes is the same diet just about everyone should follow. It boils down to a few key actions:

A person with diabetes has a condition in which the quantity of glucose in the blood is too elevated (hyperglycemia). This is because the body either does not produce enough insulin, produces no insulin, or has cells that do not respond properly to the insulin the pancreas produces. This results in too much glucose building up in the blood. This excess blood glucose eventually passes out of the body in urine. So, even though the blood has plenty of glucose, the cells are not getting it for their essential energy and growth requirements.

Your doctor will check your blood glucose levels, and if you are diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor will guide you on a plan to keep your blood sugar levels normal. If your diabetes is mild, your doctor will likely recommend a diet plan, exercise, and weight loss. Your doctor may prescribe medications that help reduce blood sugar levels. In some women, insulin may be necessary.

Exenatide is the first in the incretin mimetic class of drugs for type 2 diabetes. Exenatide shares many therapeutic properties with GLP-1, and it mimics natural physiology for self-regulating blood sugar. Namely, exenatide slows stomach emptying and slows the release of glucose from the liver, thereby regulating delivery of nutrients to the intestine for absorption. Exenatide also works centrally in the brain to regulate hunger.

Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results.

Other forms of diabetes mellitus include congenital diabetes, which is due to genetic defects of insulin secretion, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, steroid diabetes induced by high doses of glucocorticoids, and several forms of monogenic diabetes.

Equipping patients with an algorithm for self-titration of insulin doses based on self-monitoring of blood glucose improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes initiating insulin (42). Comprehensive education regarding self-monitoring of blood glucose, diet, and the avoidance of and appropriate treatment of hypoglycemia are critically important in any patient using insulin.

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