“diabetes pain”

There is no cure for diabetes. The immediate goals are to stabilize your blood sugar and eliminate the symptoms of high blood sugar. The long-term goals of treatment are to prolong life, relieve symptoms, and prevent long-term complications such as heart disease, amputations, and kidney failure.

If you’re experiencing symptoms of diabetes, you should make an appointment with your doctor. During this time, you should ask your doctor if there’s anything you need to do before your appointment, such as prepare for any labs tests. This may be necessary if your doctor wants to perform a fasting blood sugar test.

If you decide to try an alternative therapy, don’t stop taking the medications that your doctor has prescribed. Be sure to discuss the use of any of these therapies with your doctor to make sure that they won’t cause adverse reactions or interact with your current therapy.

Reaching and keeping a healthy weight are very important for managing diabetes. You should also follow your recommended diabetes diet, exercise regularly, manage your stress, and see your doctor regularly for necessary checkups.

Commit to managing your diabetes. Learn all you can about type 2 diabetes. Make healthy eating and physical activity part of your daily routine. Establish a relationship with a diabetes educator, and ask your diabetes treatment team for help when you need it.

Diabetes affects the outer, tough membrane part of the eyes; the front part, which is clear and curved; the cornea/retina, which focus light; and the macula. According to the National Diabetes Assocation, almost everyone with type 1 diabetes eventually has nonproliferative retinopathy, and most people with type 2 diabetes also get it. (8)

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that is often diagnosed in childhood. It occurs when the body mistakenly attacks the beta cells of the pancreas, making it impossible for them to produce the insulin necessary to use sugars.

^ Jump up to: a b Wild S, Roglic G, Green A, Sicree R, King H (2004). “Global prevalence of diabetes: Estimates for the year 2000 and projections for 2030”. Diabetes Care. 27 (5): 1047–53. doi:10.2337/diacare.27.5.1047. PMID 15111519.

Jump up ^ Picot, J; Jones, J; Colquitt, JL; Gospodarevskaya, E; Loveman, E; Baxter, L; Clegg, AJ (September 2009). “The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric (weight loss) surgery for obesity: a systematic review and economic evaluation”. Health technology assessment (Winchester, England). 13 (41): 1–190, 215–357, iii–iv. doi:10.3310/hta13410. PMID 19726018.

Dr. Sivitz emphasizes the importance of being active, eating a healthy diet, and having a good understanding of the role that carbohydrates play. He recommends eating healthy carbs, such as nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, and nonfat dairy products. A certified diabetes educator or a registered dietitian can help personalize your diet and teach you strategies to control your blood sugar. Depending on your desired blood sugar range and weight loss goals, recommendations for foods, carbohydrate intake, portion sizes may vary. Regardless, if you have diabetes, it will be important to count carbs in your diet because, while not off limits, they can lead to blood sugar spikes when overeaten.

Your body is like a car—it needs fuel to function. Its primary source of fuel is glucose (sugar), which is gained from foods that contain carbohydrates that get broken down. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, takes sugar from your blood to your cells to use for energy. However, when you have diabetes, either your pancreas isn’t making enough insulin or the insulin that your body is making isn’t being used the way it’s supposed to be, typically because the cells become resistant to it.

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate the amount of carbs you need by first figuring out what percentage of your diet should be made up of carbohydrates. (The NIDDK notes that experts generally recommend this number be somewhere between 45 and 65 percent of your total calories, but people with diabetes are almost always recommended to stay lower than this range.) Multiply that percentage by your calorie target. For example, if you’re aiming to get 50 percent of your calories from carbs and you eat 2,000 calories a day, you’re aiming for about 1,000 calories of carbs. Because the NIDDK says 1 gram (g) of carbohydrates provides 4 calories, you can divide the calories of carbs number by 4 to get your daily target for grams of carbs, which comes out to 250 g in this example. For a more personalized daily carbohydrate goal, it’s best to work with a certified diabetes educator or a registered dietitian to determine a goal that is best for you.

Wild Alaskan salmon, halibut, or sable fish and a grilled or roasted vegetable assortment. In the summer, try squash, peppers, onions, and mushrooms. In the fall and winter, try beets, carrots, onions, and potatoes. Also, brown rice, a sweet potato with butter, or corn on the cob.

Many infections are associated with diabetes. Infections are frequently more dangerous in someone with diabetes because the body’s normal ability to fight infections is impaired. To compound the problem, infections may worsen glucose control, which further delays recovery from infection.

As with type 2 diabetes, extra weight is linked to gestational diabetes. Women who are overweight or obese may already have insulin resistance when they become pregnant. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy may also be a factor.

Jump up ^ Nathan DM, Cleary PA, Backlund JY, Genuth SM, Lachin JM, Orchard TJ, Raskin P, Zinman B (December 2005). “Intensive diabetes treatment and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes”. The New England Journal of Medicine. 353 (25): 2643–53. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa052187. PMC 2637991 . PMID 16371630.

Knowing your blood-sugar levels and acting accordingly are among the most important ways to treat T1D. Monitoring lets a person know when insulin may be needed to correct high blood sugar or when carbohydrates may be needed to correct low blood sugar. Monitoring blood sugar can be done using traditional blood-sugar meters or continuous glucose monitors (CGMs).

Comments

  1. Agnes

    Exercise: Regular exercise, in any form, can help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Activity can also reduce the risk of developing complications of diabetes such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, and leg ulcers.
    Amylin synthetic derivatives: Amylin is a naturally occurring hormone secreted by the pancreas along with insulin. An amylin derivative, such as pramlintide (Symlin), can help control blood sugar when insulin alone does not. Pramlintide is administered as a subcutaneous injection along with insulin and helps achieve lower blood sugar levels after meals, helps reduce fluctuation of blood sugar levels throughout the day, and improves hemoglobin A1c levels.
    It may also be helpful to bring your family into the loop. Educate them about the warning signs of blood sugar levels that are too high or too low so that they can help in an emergency. If everyone in your home follows a healthy diet and participates in physical activity, you’ll all benefit.
    An article in the journal Nutrition & Metabolism found that the compounds in guava leaf tea inhibit the absorption of certain types of sugar, so that the levels do not fire after meals. In one study, people drank guava tea after eating white rice. They had a much lower glucose increase than people who drank hot water.

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