“diabetes quizlet”

Monitor your fasting insulin level. This is every bit as important as your fasting blood sugar. You’ll want your fasting insulin level to be between 2 and 4. The higher your level, the worse your insulin sensitivity is.

The word diabetes (/ˌdaɪ.əˈbiːtiːz/ or /ˌdaɪ.əˈbiːtɪs/) comes from Latin diabētēs, which in turn comes from Ancient Greek διαβήτης (diabētēs), which literally means “a passer through; a siphon”.[102] Ancient Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia (fl. 1st century CE) used that word, with the intended meaning “excessive discharge of urine”, as the name for the disease.[103][104] Ultimately, the word comes from Greek διαβαίνειν (diabainein), meaning “to pass through,”[102] which is composed of δια- (dia-), meaning “through” and βαίνειν (bainein), meaning “to go”.[103] The word “diabetes” is first recorded in English, in the form diabete, in a medical text written around 1425.

One serving of broccoli is 1 cup raw or 1/2 cup cooked. You can enjoy it raw with hummus or a low-calorie dressing, or use it chopped in eggs, pizzas, pastas, salads, and stir-fries. The key to great-tasting cooked broccoli: Don’t overcook it. The stem portion should be barely tender, and the broccoli should be bright green.

An apple a day keeps the doctor away — specifically the cardiologist. A 2012 study at Ohio State University published in the Journal of Functional Foods found that eating just one apple a day for four weeks lowered LDL (bad) cholesterol by 40 percent. The professor leading the study explained that not all antioxidants are created equal, and that a particular type of antioxidant in apples had a profound effect on lowering LDLs, a contributor to heart disease. The study was funded in part by a grant from the U.S. Apple Association, among other supporters.

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy.

It seems clear that the successful ones eat very low amounts of refined sugars and simple starches. They may have small amounts of truly whole grains (not stuff that is marketed as “whole grain” but is actually highly processed). They eat small amounts of fruits and starchy vegetables. (Diabetic low-carb guru Dr. Richard Bernstein says he hasn’t eaten a piece of fruit in decades.)

Type 2 DM is primarily due to lifestyle factors and genetics.[41] A number of lifestyle factors are known to be important to the development of type 2 DM, including obesity (defined by a body mass index of greater than 30), lack of physical activity, poor diet, stress, and urbanization.[13] Excess body fat is associated with 30% of cases in those of Chinese and Japanese descent, 60–80% of cases in those of European and African descent, and 100% of Pima Indians and Pacific Islanders.[8] Even those who are not obese often have a high waist–hip ratio.[8]

A: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) typically develops after age 40, but has recently begun to appear with more frequency in children. If a person is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, their pancreas still produces insulin, but the body does not produce enough or is not able to use it effectively.

— Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, is the national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, specializing in African American nutrition, and author of the African American Guide to Living Well With Diabetes and Eating Soulfully and Healthfully With Diabetes.

An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) entails drinking a beverage containing glucose and then having your blood glucose levels checked every 30 to 60 minutes for up to 3 hours. If the glucose level is 200 mg/dL or higher at 2 hours, then you might have diabetes.

Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe.

To prevent further diabetic complications as well as serious oral problems, diabetic persons must keep their blood sugar levels under control and have a proper oral hygiene. A study in the Journal of Periodontology found that poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients are more likely to develop periodontal disease than well-controlled diabetics are.[71] At the same time, diabetic patients are recommended to have regular checkups with a dental care provider at least once in three to four months. Diabetics who receive good dental care and have good insulin control typically have a better chance at avoiding gum disease to help prevent tooth loss.[74]

Sugar and processed carbohydrates should be limited, says Massey. That includes soda, candy, and other packaged or processed snacks, such as corn chips, potato chips, and the like. And while artificial sweeteners like those found in diet sodas won’t necessarily spike your blood sugar in the same way as sugar, they could still have an effect on your blood sugar and even alter your body’s insulin response, though more research is needed to confirm this.

Jump up ^ Ali, S.; Stone, M. A.; Peters, J. L.; Davies, M. J.; Khunti, K. (2006-11-01). “The prevalence of co-morbid depression in adults with Type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis”. Diabetic Medicine. 23 (11): 1165–73. doi:10.1111/j.1464-5491.2006.01943.x. ISSN 1464-5491.

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes lead to high blood sugar levels, called hyperglycemia. Over a long period of time, hyperglycemia damages the retina of the eye, blood vessels of the kidneys and other organs, and the nerves.

Acanthosis nigricans: A dark, “velvety” patch of skin can appear in the armpits, groin, and neck folds, and over the joints of the fingers and toes. It is an indicator of high insulin and is seen more commonly in African Americans.

Papadakis MA, ed., et al. Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 2014. 53rd ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2014. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/book.aspx?bookId=330. Accessed April 27, 2014.

First you must wash the leek with roots. Then you should pour approximately 2 ounces of the bottle with mineral water. Place the leek with the roots in the bottle and let it stand for 24 hours. The next

To eat less meat and also less carbs seems quite a challenge. Everyone agrees on eating high amounts of green vegetables, especially leafy ones. Nuts are also terrific low-carb foods. Starchy vegetables have to be eaten in moderation.

Optimize your gut flora. Your gut is a living ecosystem, full of both good bacteria and bad. Multiple studies have shown that obese people have different intestinal bacteria than lean people. The more good bacteria you have, the stronger your immune system will be and the better body will function overall. Fortunately, optimizing your gut flora is relatively easy. You can reseed your body with good bacteria by eating fermented foods (such as fermented vegetables, natto, raw organic cheese, or raw milk kefir) or by taking a high-quality probiotic supplement.

McCulloch DK, Hayward RA, et al. Screening for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Up to Date. Aug. 7, 2017. Accessed Jan. 27, 2018 at https://www.uptodate.com/contents/screening-for-type-2-diabetes-mellitus#H18058884

One thought on ““diabetes quizlet””

  1. Jump up ^ Lee IM, Shiroma EJ, Lobelo F, Puska P, Blair SN, Katzmarzyk PT (1 July 2012). “Effect of physical inactivity on major non-communicable diseases worldwide: an analysis of burden of disease and life expectancy”. The Lancet. 380 (9838): 219–29. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61031-9. PMC 3645500 . PMID 22818936.
    The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) studied the effects of tight blood sugar control on complications in type 1 diabetes. Patients treated for tight blood glucose control had an average HbA1c of approximately 7%, while patients treated less aggressively had an average HbA1c of about 9%. At the end of the study, the tight blood glucose group had dramatically fewer cases of kidney disease, eye disease, and nervous system disease than the less-aggressively treated patients.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Gonzalez, J.S., Tanenbaum, M.L, Commissariat P.V. (2016). “Psychosocial factors in medication adherence and diabetes self-management: implications for research and practice”. American Psychologist. 71: 539–51. doi:10.1037/a0040388.

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