“diabetes treatment”

^ Jump up to: a b c d Grams, J.; Garvey, W. Timothy (June 2015). “Weight Loss and the Prevention and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Using Lifestyle Therapy, Pharmacotherapy, and Bariatric Surgery: Mechanisms of Action”. Current Obesity Reports. 4 (2): 287–302. doi:10.1007/s13679-015-0155-x. ISSN 2162-4968. PMID 26627223.

For people with diabetes, weight loss success is not only measured by the scale, but also by blood sugar control. “People can put diabetes into remission or reverse its course if they lose weight,” says Osama Hamdy, M.D., Ph.D., medical director of the Obesity Clinical Program at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. “In my research, I’ve found that when people lose 7 percent of their body weight, their insulin sensitivity improves by 57 percent. That is better than taking two medications for diabetes at the maximum dose.”

Low glycemic index foods also may be helpful. The glycemic index is a measure of how quickly a food causes a rise in your blood sugar. Foods with a high glycemic index raise your blood sugar quickly. Low glycemic index foods may help you achieve a more stable blood sugar. Foods with a low glycemic index typically are foods that are higher in fiber.

It is easier for your body to absorb lycopene from cooked and processed tomatoes, such as tomato juice, than from fresh tomatoes. Also, canned products such as tomato paste, tomato sauce, and pasta sauce have approximately seven times more lycopene than raw tomatoes. Adding a bit of oil while sauteing or cooking tomatoes can aid lycopene absorption, according to Health Gourmet: Eat to Beat Diabetes (McGraw-Hill, 2006).

As for packaging, frozen veggies without sauce are just as nutritious as fresh, and even low-sodium canned veggies can be a good choice if you’re in a pinch. Just be sure to watch your sodium intake to avoid high blood pressure, and consider draining and rinsing salted canned veggies before eating, per the ADA. If possible, opt for low-sodium or sodium-free canned veggies if going that route.

g stockstudio/shutterstockOf course you’re exhausted every now and then. But ongoing fatigue is an important symptom to pay attention to; it might mean the food you’re eating for energy isn’t being broken down and used by cells as it’s supposed to. “You’re not getting the fuel your body needs,” says Dobbins. “You’re going to be tired and feel sluggish.” But in many cases of type 2 diabetes, your sugar levels can be elevated for awhile, so these diabetes symptoms could come on slowly.

The next time you pour yourself a cup of tea, you could be doing your health a favor. Tea contains antioxidant-rich flavonoids called catechins, which seem to reduce the risk of heart disease by helping blood vessels dilate, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Tea also has been shown to improve cholesterol levels, alleviate stress, and reduce the risk of a number of cancers.

^ up to: a b c American Diabetes Association (Jan 2014). “Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2014”. Diabetes Care. 37 (suppl 1): S14–S80. doi:10.2337/dc14-S014. PMID 24357209. Retrieved 1 Nov 2014.

The “diabetes diet” is not something that people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes should be following. “That just simply isn’t how meal planning works today for patients with diabetes,” says Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, a nutritionist at Joslin and co-author of 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet.

For those who are taking the baby-steps approach to eating better, this list is even more helpful. Not only are these power foods high in fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins and minerals, they’re also familiar and easy to find. That means you don’t have to hunt down any exotic ingredients or shop at specialty grocery stores to find foods that will help you get on track with a healthful meal plan.

Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with “sweet urine,” and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine.

Jump up ^ Kim, YW; Kim, KH; Choi, HJ; Lee, DS (2005). “Anti-diabetic activity of beta-glucans and their enzymatically hydrolyzed oligosaccharides from Agaricus blazei”. Biotechnology letters. 27 (7): 483–87. doi:10.1007/s10529-005-2225-8. PMID 15928854.

Glucophage or Glucophage XR (metformin), in the class biguanides, is the recommended first-line oral treatment for type 2 diabetes by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Metformin does not cause weight gain or elevate insulin levels. Metformin reduces hyperglycemia by decreasing liver gluconeogenesis (sugar production), decreases glycogenolysis (the breakdown of glycogen to glucose-1-phosphate and glucose) and increases sensitivity to insulin. Avandia (rosiglitazone) and Actos (pioglitazone) are thiazolidinediones that also work by increasing insulin sensitivity.

Comments

  1. Agnes

    DPP-4 inhibitors. These medications help reduce blood sugar levels, but tend to have a modest effect. They don’t cause weight gain. Examples of these medications are sitagliptin (Januvia), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and linagliptin (Tradjenta).
    According to a review of clinical trials published in December 2014 in JAMA Surgery, people with diabetes who underwent bariatric surgery had greater weight loss than those who received nonsurgical treatment, and the surgery was more effective in helping obese participants get diabetes under control. An article on the notable Surgical Treatment and Medications Potentially Eradicate Diabetes Efficiently trial, which was published in February 2017 in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests that gastric bypass surgery and sleeve gastrectomy helped people with diabetes attain better glycemic control than medication alone. Compared with the medication-only group, people who underwent the surgeries also saw greater reductions in heart disease risk and medication use, as well as an improved quality of life.

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